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Blaze Magic
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I have come across a problem which I hadn't thought would ever be an issue, which is I am afraid some of my magic might be too good prior to the end of the show.
As an example, I often do a giant 3 card monte routine prior to the finale. I find sometimes during it, people will be visibly shocked during the routine, shout a compliment or possibly some swearing, and then walk away as I continue the routine. On top of that they are often in a small group, so the other will leave with them, and that of course that do damage to the crowd in general.

There is the same issue doing an escape before the finale. Even if I announce just before hand that I am going to do something even more amazing afterwards, I will lose a part of my crowd as I am starting the finale routine.

And then even during the finale (cup routine I have been developing), people will start to walk away as I am producing the final loads. In that case it might have more to do with not wanting to pay anything.

Anyway, has anyone else had the same issue, losing part of your crowd during strong routines, and how did you resolve it? Ideally I would like to make my act into more of a single show that is heavily interwoven, rather than routines, but that is something I am still working on.
Nickoli Sharpe
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I think this is a common problem people walking off not wanting to pay.
Jaun Tamera’s has a book called five points of magic in it he talks about
creating threads with your audiences eyes throughout your show.
One thing that I find very helpful is to hand a prop out
talking about the fact you’re going to be performing that effect later in the show and they don’t want to miss it.
Straight jacket the cups from cups and balls maybe a rope whatever your finale is, hand it out they won’t leave because they’re holding onto it.
I hope this helps good luck and see you on the street.
Nickoli
Zauberman
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I use to have the same problem with women. I was just too dam charming & good looking. Walking out on me all the time LOL

OK, I'm being silly. But the point being it isn't cause you're too good.

My guess is people are leaving your show/routine due to closure.
Closure is a killer on the street.

Magicians like to end each routine/bit with finale. Whether it be Ambitious card ending up in wallet or coins across ending up as a Jumbo.
Once the spectator has seen an effect....they'll often walk. They seen something, and have other more important things to tend to.

So you gonna have to change things a bit, so they're still anticipating that big moment, and are caught up in the entertainment so that they put of where they were going in the first place.

This is a lot easier in some pitches than others. Saturday evening, where couples/tourists/families have had a meal, glass of wine and walking about....this is not so much of a problem. Other times/places....even the best can't hold a audience.

Such is the streets.
Vandecarr
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Nickoli is giving you sound advice. Have people holding your props. Sell the heck out of your finale. Something "more' amazing isn't a good selling point because they see everything on youtube. In a minute, I'm going to do the trick that got me banned from AGT? The trick that got me kicked off AGT before I even auditioned. The trick that no other magician will do, because there's no need for it.... You get the idea. It doesn't have to be roll on the floor funny, just engaging. Use self depreciating humor. It works!

In my opinion, the cups are not good for a street finale, anymore! There is a reason why Gazzo hardly does the cups anymore. There's no money in it. On the street, you've gotta be different. The best way to be different is to be more funny, which is easier said then done!

When people walk away, don't ignore it! Say something... It doesn't have to be crass, like Gazzo. A simple "come back later, we're going to be playing bingo" is good enough! Experience will teach you all of these things, just keep at it.
markmagic
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Trick that got me kicked off of AGT??? Mike have you seen my show?
Blaze Magic
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Quote:
On Dec 23, 2019, Nickoli Sharpe wrote:


Excellent advice, thank you very much!
I have been slightly concerned handing props out which are hard for me to replace in case they get stolen (more in a drunken pranking sort of way), but I think I should just go ahead and do it. And I need to spend more time hyping up the finale.

Quote:
On Dec 23, 2019, Zauberman wrote:


I must admit, I made the title rather click-baity Smile
Closure is a very good way of putting it. What I find interesting is in my 3 card monte routine, out of the three phases, the 2nd phase seems to be the biggest problem, even though it doesn't seem very end-ish and I go right into the 3rd phase. Maybe just hyping up what's next ahead of time would help.


Quote:
On Dec 23, 2019, Vandecarr wrote:

Those are some excellent ideas, thank you very much!
I think I am just lucky, but in the area I am performing in, no one seems to do any kind of cup routine. If it gets as popular as it is in other places though, then I will probably have to dump it, but I really hope that doesn't happen.

And I really need to get better with one liners and general remarks. Also crowd management is something I need to improve on, to get the children to stand further back, and the adults to come forward, as currently a lot of the time it ends up a lot more messy than I would like.



Thank you again everyone for your ideas and advice, and if anyone else has any suggestions, I would love to hear them!
Right now I will try to restructure my show to have more people holding props for later, add lots of hype for my finale, and try to get better with my lines (especially hatting lines). And there are countless more things I should work on, and I will reread everyone messages again later as there's a heap to learn from them.
Vandecarr
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Hey Mark,

I've never seen your show...LOL is that a line you use? Great minds think alike...LOL
Illusionsfortheblind2
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This is what I do to keep a full crowd. I don't do this every time, as sometimes I get a full crowd but they aren't a very good crowd, and don't do my finale, and just hat after my second trick

My first trick is card to mouth

Usually that stops another group

Then I anchor with the ropes for my second trick and hand them out for examination

When I do my second trick I don't anchor, I just work slower and try to involve people from different groups, I had a problem where people left after this trick so this was my final trick for a long time.

So when I'm about to end it I just say "I'm going to break the illusion, then I'm going to do my grand finale, if you guys want to see my grand finale say yeah" if only two people say it, do it again " c'mon I need more energy this time.."

You create a psychological thing where THEY want to see your finale, if people leave after this it's most like because they don't want to pay.

I get some good hats doing this, hope that helps
kcmagic1
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Quote:
On Dec 23, 2019, Blaze Magic wrote:
I have come across a problem which I hadn't thought would ever be an issue, which is I am afraid some of my magic might be too good prior to the end of the show.
As an example, I often do a giant 3 card monte routine prior to the finale. I find sometimes during it, people will be visibly shocked during the routine, shout a compliment or possibly some swearing, and then walk away as I continue the routine. On top of that they are often in a small group, so the other will leave with them, and that of course that do damage to the crowd in general.

There is the same issue doing an escape before the finale. Even if I announce just before hand that I am going to do something even more amazing afterwards, I will lose a part of my crowd as I am starting the finale routine.

And then even during the finale (cup routine I have been developing), people will start to walk away as I am producing the final loads. In that case it might have more to do with not wanting to pay anything.

Anyway, has anyone else had the same issue, losing part of your crowd during strong routines, and how did you resolve it? Ideally I would like to make my act into more of a single show that is heavily interwoven, rather than routines, but that is something I am still working on.


I have found that when people walk away from a show, it isn't that they don't want to pay, it is that they don't feel engaged. It doesn't matter how strong of a routine you feel something is, it matters if the audience feels that it is an engaging routine that they want to stick around for. If audience members are leaving, try to change your routine slightly during every show and see how the audience reacts. Performing on the street, your magic doesn't need to be strong, just entertaining.
Designer of the 1000-G cups - the most durable cups in magic www.kristiancharles.com/1000-g
Blaze Magic
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I think there are a number of reasons people walk away. The people who stay the entire show, but leave quickly the instant money is mentioned are most likely leaving because they don't want to pay.
There are many reasons I can't control (such as people having to get back to work or parents who have no interest in magic dragging their children away), and there are certainly some people who will leave just because I can't engage them enough, which just means I need to keep working on things.

What I find interesting is when I do something amazing in the volunteers hand, and they shout something like "HOLY !@#$, YOU'RE HARRY POTTER!" in genuine shock as they are walking away.
They are very clearly impressed, but they also don't seem to have much interest in staying. One possible reason is that they don't realise there is more show happening, although I think that usually isn't the case. Rather, I think at some times at least, they have seen something amazing which they are content with, so even though they enjoyed it, they also feel like they have enough.

A lot also seems to depend on the situation and people, in that a lot of the people I am discussing stop by for a very short amount of time, while other times I extend my show and the crowd would have been happy to see another 20 minutes. I just find it fascinating that so many people give reactions similar to a David Blaine TV special, yet they don't seem to be interested in seeing more.
kcmagic1
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You are correct. There are many reasons why people walk away. Peoples time is probably the number one reason and you really have no control over that. If they have to be somewhere, they have to be somewhere. There is a big difference though between amazing someone and entertaining someone. There is also a big difference in doing tricks and doing a show. When busking, I have found that the flow of the show is very important. It allows the audience to know that it is a show and that I am not just doing one or two tricks and turning the audience over. I guess that I am not giving the audience a chance to think that the show is over.
What I am reading from your post is that, I believe, that the people walking away with those reactions, feel like the show is done and don't realize that there is more to come. I am not sure that I am explaining that right but I hope that you get what I am trying to say. I also don't know what type of shows that you are doing. Are you doing more of a 5 minute sidewalk show or are you doing a 20 - 45 minute larger show? In my experience, the flow of the show is the most important part. If the audience feels as though you are just doing tricks, they are more likely to walk away after one or two, strong reactions or not. On the other hand, if you are able to weave those tricks together into a routine, or a show, they are more likely to stay. If you are dong a larger show, you can also mention the show and the tricks that are yet to come in the show. That also helps let the audience know that you are doing more than a couple of tricks. Making a connection with the audience also helps. I find it easier to do that by making them laugh rather than trying to fool them. I do thousands of street shows a year and if I don't feel like I've made a connection with an audience, or made them laugh, I know that my hats are going to reflect that.
I don't know if this helps but it is what I have found through my personal experiences.
Designer of the 1000-G cups - the most durable cups in magic www.kristiancharles.com/1000-g
Blaze Magic
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That is very helpful advice, thank you very much!

Currently I am doing pretty short shows around 10 minutes or less. During the day I often need to cut that down to more like 5 or 6 minutes. At night most people are happy to stay a lot longer so I tried extending it to 15 minutes which went fine, but I've gone back to 10 minutes, as I found I make more doing 3 x 10 minute shows, versus 2 x 15 minute shows.
I'm still playing around with things though, so I will probably try out some other variations.

Right now I am arranging the next effect as the previous one finishes, and gather up the props from people for the previous effect as I am explaining the next one. So they are each separate tricks, but I don't really have any time in between them.
One thing I think I need to do is start advertising my grand finale throughout the show. Unfortunately a lot of my audience don't speak any or extremely little English (and they all speak different languages, so there isn't just one or two I could learn).

Another thing I have noticed is the main people coming in for a short time and then leaving while making loud comments tend to be people in their very late teens to early 20s, and are probably often drunk or high, which may contribute to their enthusiastic comments. In most cases if they stay they don't tip anyway, but having them appear and leaving can still take away from the show and encourages other people to leave, so rather than trying to keep them, maybe I should really be putting more effort into figuring out lines to say during those times when they leave.
kcmagic1
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You can always just say, " come back, There is a lot more to my show." or simply just, " the show is not over." As far as Hispanic origin, I've been told that in their culture, they expect you to approach them with your hat for them to drop money into. They are not used to bringing money to you. I think that 10 minute shows are great! I would much rather do my smaller show, about 13 minutes, than I would my longer show, about 25-30 minutes. It also helps to get your audience to make noise for you and help draw more people to watch the show.
I should mention that I only do my longer show in situations where I have to share a pitch with someone else and I get fewer shows in. But for doing sidewalk shows, 5 - 10 minutes probably works best!

I should let you know that I was never trained in street performing. When I started out over 24 years ago, when I was 19. I only did it because I wanted to perform. There wasn't a lot of people in my city doing it and the one's that were, were doing it in a style that I didn't choose to do it in. I came up with a routine to perform in the round. I set up in the middle of everyone. I didn't have the internet to watch. I had books and vhs tapes, none of which were on street performing. I feel like that gave me a little different insight into street performing and why I feel the way that I do. My short 5 minute show consists of a 4 ace routine. I say routine because I have strung 3, 4 ace tricks together ending with just using the 4 aces for a trick. That's what I mean about weaving the tricks together. I produce the 4 aces, I lose and find the 4 aces and then I switch the 4 aces at the finally. Sometime weaving and making a show flow is just as simple as talking and other times it takes a little more effort.
Designer of the 1000-G cups - the most durable cups in magic www.kristiancharles.com/1000-g
gallagher
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Blaze Magic,...welcome to The Side Walk Shuffle.
The Magic Café's coffee department(!).
....good to the last drop.
Welcome.

Blaze Magic.
Blaze Foley is one of my favourite singers.
...unfortunately,..deceased.
Still,.a great singer,..great song writer.
Blaze.

Blaze, I believe folks leave Magic Shows,..
or ANY Show,
for that matter;
because they are bored,..
or the quality isn't worth,
......the price of admssion.
Sometimes,...BOTH.

Even,...(ESPECIALLY!),..on the Streets.

'Time',..sometimes,..has its hands in the spiel..
(That was a pun. 😊! 'Hands',..like,..'Hands of the clock. 😕)

Cmm,..sorry.
'Cheapness', doesn't play much of a factor.

I've never witnessed anything(!),
that was TOO good,..
therefore,..I felt like leaving.
Actually,..the exact OPPOSITE!

There is some good advice, above..
handing out props, ect.,.
But, you will only be playing on the 'goodness of the people'.
Is that what you want to base your Show apon?
May be it.

I would advise you to work on two things.
A.) The quality of your Magic.
Technique. Originality. Props.

B.) Your Presentation.
Text. Delivery. Experience.

Show structure WILL develope.
Trust me on that one.

Yeah.
It takes some time.
When it 'comes',
that 'time', will be the foundation of your 'career'.
A strong one.

That's what I'm thinking, in the moment..
Here's a little something, to enjoy with me.
https://youtu.be/69YCXgVdyR4

Good night Blaze.
Gallagher
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