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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Trick coin trickery » » Cylinder and coins (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

MagicVin
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Regular user
Staten Island, New York
191 Posts

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Looking for the best place to learn this routine. Video is my preferred media because I’m a visual & auditory learner so I learn better from video than books .
Smile Smile Smile Magic is all around us we just have to be willing to see it.
Wilktone
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Asheville, NC
240 Posts

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First, you should disavow yourself of the myth that people are "visual" or "auditory" learners. This idea was debunked long ago, even though it still persists - even among professional educators. There's no evidence that catering to an individual's supposed learning style has any advantage to learning the material. In fact, it's linked with worse outcomes in the long term. There's nothing wrong with wanting to learn from videos or books, but what you should search for is good material taught well, regardless of the medium (https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/04/the-myth-of-learning-styles/557687/).

I don't know your current experience and abilities with coins. Are you familiar enough to understand what props and gaff(s) you'll need to obtain? Some routines will work better with dollar sized coins and some with smaller sized coins. Do you want to use a wand or not? There are different handlings of Cylinder and Coins that might be preferable to you.

Here are the ones I'm familiar with and some thoughts about them.

John Carney - Carney teaches this routine in two places that I know of. It's apparently pretty close to Ramsey's original, with some modifications. If you want video look for "Carney on Ramsey" (https://carneymagic.com/product/carney-on-ramsay-dvd/). It's also covered in Carney's book "Carneycopia," which can be found in book form here (https://www.vanishingincmagic.com/stage-and-parlor-magic/carneycopia/). Both of these seem to be out of print now. Carney's version seems to work best with soft silver dollar coins and uses a wand.

Doug Brewer - Brewer teaches his handling on his DVD "Red Light" (https://www.wholesalemagic.com/products/Red-Light-Coin-Magic-for-the-Walk-Around-Performer-By-Douglas-Brewer.html). Brewer's version requires an additional gaff that most coin magicians already own and can be done with half dollars. He uses a Sharpie as a wand substitute in this routine, but for the most part doesn't need one.

David Roth - In "David Roth's Expert Coin Magic" there is a version that can work with half dollars and doesn't use a wand. This book is currently out of print, but Richard Kaufman has posted a couple of times on the Café that a reprint is in the works. Used copies might be found if you look around.

Out of these three versions I find Brewer's version easiest, but I don't think any of them are easy. I've only every "performed" Roth's version for the camera. I've played around with Brewer's version and if I ever get to the point of where I might perform this routine would probably try to perfect that one (possibly taking elements from the other ones and plugging them in). Carney's routine would probably play "bigger" than the others, if you're planning on performing for larger crowds who might be further back. Roth's and Brewer's would work better for a smaller audience up close, I think.

Good luck!

Dave
Degio
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Regular user
It took me years to get to
115 Posts

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A very creative approach can be found in the book Coins And Other Fables by Luis Piedrahita.
For a performance, have a look here: https://youtu.be/EsYHnNpxLyo
If you prefer learning from video, I believe Luis explained his version in a download that has been reviewed here: https://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/view......c=538840

I like the usage of a toilet paper roll, while the "cork" is replaced by a small paper ball, which naturally comes to play.
inigmntoya
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Inner circle
DC area native, now in Atlanta
2063 Posts

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Quote:
On Jan 17, 2021, Wilktone wrote:
First, you should disavow yourself of the myth that people are "visual" or "auditory" learners.


Call it whatever you want, but I zone out when trying to read books. Always have, and I could "disavow" it until the cows come home but that's not going to change it one bit.

That something isn't a problem for you doesn't mean it's not an issue for others.
Jonathan Townsend
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Eternal Order
Ossining, NY
27134 Posts

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Do you want to learn the basic effect or the John Ramsay routine?
...to all the coins I've dropped here
MJ Marrs
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Inner circle
Los Angeles
1111 Posts

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John Carney has an excellent DVD teaching C & C. Highly recommended.

https://carneymagic.com/product/carney-on-ramsay-dvd/

I combined the DVD and his awesome book to learn the routine. I can hardly wait for the Conover treatise that Eric Mead is writing. It will have significant work on C & C.
Wilktone
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Loyal user
Asheville, NC
240 Posts

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Quote:
On Jan 17, 2021, inigmntoya wrote:
Quote:
On Jan 17, 2021, Wilktone wrote:
First, you should disavow yourself of the myth that people are "visual" or "auditory" learners.


Call it whatever you want, but I zone out when trying to read books. Always have, and I could "disavow" it until the cows come home but that's not going to change it one bit.

That something isn't a problem for you doesn't mean it's not an issue for others.


There is a difference between having trouble with reading or with focus and having a "learning style."

As a music educator I have a professional interest in pedagogy. Unlike music (and other subjects), magic does not have a tradition of formal instruction that objectively looks at teaching and learning outcomes. In lieu of that, I think it's worth adopting what other subjects in the field have discovered about how we learn, improve, and retain information and motor skills.

Quote:
I like the usage of a toilet paper roll, while the "cork" is replaced by a small paper ball, which naturally comes to play.


That's a great idea! The props are more relatable than a leather cylinder and small bit of cork. I do hope, however, that the paper ball doesn't come into play too naturally. Smile
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