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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Deckless! » » Patter for Phil Goldstein's "Overture"? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Bob G
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Hi folks,


"Overture" is the opening trick in Goldstein's book Focus, a book which I'm getting just advanced enough now to appreciate -- a lot. I admire the elegance and simplicity of the *method*, and it's a nice short trick with which to practice some basic sleights, but I'm not sure how it would play for audiences. I know it plays well for *some* audiences, because I've read several comments on the Café about how much people like this trick.


I would think that spectators might see the motions the magician goes through as rather meaningless. So I wonder if admirers of the trick can tell me how they put the effect across. I have a few ideas for little stories that would attach meaning to the motions, but haven't come up with anything I really like yet.


Thanks as always,


Bob
Claudio
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Overture is a sweet packet trick.

I don't have much idea of a patter to suggest, but remember that you can always use different cards (like 2 red Aces and 2 black Queens, say) if that helps stimulate your imagination.
Bob G
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Thanks, Claudio. Apparently you're able to make the trick effective for your spectators without anything unusual in the way of patter, then? I could, for instance, just say, "Let's reverse the cards, feed them through the magic tunnel, and bring them back to their original order." Then how the result. Maybe that would be enough?
Claudio
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I don’t perform this effect, Bob, but I should as it so simple and baffling.

I remember a friend of mine used to perform it decades ago and he was using a Star Trek theme of teleportation with the line like “Beam me up, Scotty”.

I know he won’t mind my sharing his presentation.
Bob G
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Interesting that he did use a story or imaginary scenario. My most promising idea so far has to do with an art theft. For it to work, I have to figure out how to simplify and shorten it to a bare minimum so that it doesn't overwhelm the trick.
Bob G
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Hi everybody,


In effect, the magician reverses the order of a packet of four cards (two face-up, two face-down), passes them through her fist, and then reverses them again; by the end of these simple moves two of the cards in the packet have not only exchanged positions with the others, but they've also changed their orientations. It's quite pretty, but it seems to me that spectators need some guidance so that they understand the difference between what what the magician has done vs. the end result.


I'm wondering what patter people use to give meaning to the reversing, and then re-reversing, of the order of the cards. I have a couple of stories in mind, but I can't quite make them work. One is an art or manuscript theft, with the reversals representing the thieves mixing up stolen paintings (or pages) and then trying to get them into the right order again. The through-the-fist flourish is the thieves hiding from the museum guards in a closet. In the beginning we see two paintings framed by reversed cards; at the end we see the thieves trapped in a jail cell.


My other thought is to describe the sun riding up into the sky during the day and sliding back down; once that's happened, night descends (represented by black cards now showing instead of red). The reversing of the cards and then the re-reversing is supposed to represent the sun's ascent and descent, but maybe that's too subtle. And I'm not sure what the fist flourish would represent.



Thanks for whatever help people can offer,


Bob
Rick Holcombe
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Since it's so quick and visual, I like to do it before Twisting The Aces.

After Overture, I say, "That might have been a little too much to take in, let me show you how each ace turns over one at a time" then I go into Twisting the aces.
MikeLarkin
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Big Phil created it as an intro to Twisting The Aces. It's not that great as a standalone, but it adds a nice bit of texture as originally intended. Given it is the sort of effect that is more informal, simple descriptive patter seems perfectly acceptable.
Bob G
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Thanks, Rick and Mike. If I remember correctly, this trick uses both an Elmsley and a Jordan. I had recently learned Jordan and was looking for a trick with which to practice both counts. Since then I've found an Oil & Water that does that job. I've decided to wait on learning Overture; I see the point about adding texture, so I may come back to the trick once I have a bigger repertoire.


By the way, Rick, I've enjoyed a great deal the videos you've posted about magic. Your calm, deliberate manner and clear explanations make them a pleasure to watch. And Mike, welcome to the Café!


Bob
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