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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Smooth as silk » » Does anyone know who invented the first blendo effect and when? (8 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

serenomagic
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Does anyone know who invented the first blendo effect and when?
Thanks,
Marco
Julie
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Maybe check Rice's Encyclopedia of Silk Magic...?

Julie
serenomagic
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On Jun 28, 2023, Julie wrote:
Maybe check Rice's Encyclopedia of Silk Magic...?

Julie


... Already done Julie... No infos about it ... neither on Tarbell... it seems that this effect has always existed!!!
FrankFindley
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From Tarbell Vol 3. page 320:

"THE PERFECTION FLAG TRICK

This Snappy effect appeared in the Original Tarbell Course under the title, "The Birth of Old Glory." Our editor, Ralph Read, wrote the original instructions for the trick when it was first introduced years ago, and he supplies its interesting history. Very few know that the late Frank Ducrot invented the "Perfection Flag Trick" and I am glad to credit that great artist with what is one of the most popular tricks in magic.

Ducrot employed 18-inch silks and 24 X 36-inch silk American Flags. A lower priced version using 13-inch silks and 12 X 18-inch flags was later brought out by W. G. Edwards who called his smaller imitation by the name "Blendo." In recent years magicians have come to call all versions by the name "Blendo," and particularly where large silks are changed into a 36 X 36-inch "Rainbow," or other specially designed silk."

From The Sphinx Vol. 7 No. 9 November 15, 1908:

Image


Regarding the effect, the Conjuring Archive also references an 1896 article of two silks being pushed through a tube changing into a bigger silk with both colors:

Die Zauberwelt
Illustriertes Journal für Salon-Magie und Moderne Wunder
(Vol. 2 No. 1) January 1896
David Todd
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Thank you , Frank, for the excellent research.
serenomagic
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Thank you Frank.
FrankFindley
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On Jun 29, 2023, serenomagic wrote:
Thank you Frank.


You are quite welcome. And welcome to the Magic Café. There are a group of people on here like Julie, David, and me who love these questions of history. For example, David started one on milk pitchers which blew my mind away. So much cool information and insight in that thread.

In this case, I find it fascinating that Blendo was actually the proper name of a specific trick which became associated with the entire class of effects, even the tricks which came before it! Check out this ad from December 1908 telling people not to confuse Blendo and The Perfection Flag Trick. Well that certainly didn't work!

The Sphinx Vol. 7 No. 10 December 15, 1908
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Julie
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On Jun 28, 2023, serenomagic wrote:
Quote:
On Jun 28, 2023, Julie wrote:
Maybe check Rice's Encyclopedia of Silk Magic...?

Julie


... Already done Julie... No infos about it ... neither on Tarbell... it seems that this effect has always existed!!!


For the record: There's a fairly respectable amount of information regarding performance pieces and variations listed in Rice's Encyclopedia of Silk Magic, volume 3, chapter 19 which is titled BLENDO EFFECTS...

Julie
David Todd
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I've always loved the concept of the "Blendo" type effect, although I've never performed it (unless you count Duke's Dye Version, which is sort of a Blendo effect, although it takes place under cover of a paper tube, rather than happening visually with no cover). While I love the concept of Blendo, the main problem I've observed in watching some other performers do it is that in the moments leading up to the transformation there is often some rather awkward fumbling/folding/wrapping/stuffing actions, whereas what I always hope to see is a smooth transformation: the magician shows 4 separate colored silks, brings them together in his hands and then spreads his hands apart as the 4 silks seem to fuse visibly into one multi-colored "blended" silk. I've occasionally seen it look like that , but not often.

I suppose it's sort of like a dove steal and production. When it is done flawlessly it can still make me gasp even though I understand what is happening. It just looks so magical when it's done smoothly, with no awkward hesitation. (you know, that thing where you can see the magician is looking down at the bunched up silk and his thumbs are laboring to undo the velcro or snaps ... it's painful to watch that).

The difficulty is learning how to do the get-ready moves smoothly without looking down at the props or your hands, without breaking eye contact with the audience.

.
JNeal
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The John Booth method is my preferred handling: two or three 18" silks change into a 36" pattern which is comprised of those exact colors. Since it doesn't use a 'bag' silk, there is just a substitution of those three, for the single silks. But the effect is fast and easy!
visit me @ JNealShow.com
FrankFindley
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On Jun 30, 2023, JNeal wrote:
The John Booth method is my preferred handling: two or three 18" silks change into a 36" pattern which is comprised of those exact colors. Since it doesn't use a 'bag' silk, there is just a substitution of those three, for the single silks. But the effect is fast and easy!


Same here. It is a wonderful follow-up to the 20th century silks. An old opener sequence I used to use went:

Double color changing cane to silks (two silks go into a hat on stand) -> lapel flower to silk -> color changing silk (using silk from lapel...afterwards put in hat) -> two silks from hat tied together, placed in glass, and handed to spectator for 20th century silks -> silk from color change vanished and appears between silks in glass (glass goes back in hat) -> Booth/Ginn 36" Blendo using these three tied together silks.

It always got a great reaction as an opener. That is a lot of colorful magic in a short time window. It is relatively inexpensive so a lot of bang for the buck. And reset was surprisingly quick once I got the hang to it. Now I do a candle/fire/multiple flower bouquets opener. Both are probably about the same in opening impact, but the flowers dresses up the area for remainder of show.

I also have been using BEKOS 2.0 as opener for guerilla show. I just can't get away from the beauty of silks!
hugmagic
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2pth Century was invented by Frank Ducot. In the 1909 Roterberg and Mysto catalog there was blendo effect that resulted in an Americian flag. Tommy Windsor came up with the mismade idea. It was written up in an old Tops.
Richard E. Hughes, Hughes Magic Inc., 352 N. Prospect St., Ravenna, OH 44266 (330)296-4023
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