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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Shuffled not Stirred » » Best book to learn the Aronson stack (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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philipmac
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There seem to be many books on the Aronson stack, but I was wondering which book is the easiest and the best to learn the Aronson stack.
Brazilian
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The best is "Bound to Please".
the74rock
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What about Try the Impossible?
Close.Up.Dave
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Out of all of his books, Bound to Please is the best because he explains the stack, the mnemonics, etc. But you don't always need that. Joshua Jay memorized it in two days. He memorized it while in his math class for 40 minutes each day. Plus, he memorized it cold, without the mnemonics. So it's not like you need to learn the stack from a specific book (considering he explains it in all of them except for Sessions).

Out of all of his books, I like Try the Impossible the best, because he has some cool memorized deck tricks in it. I don't like his spelling tricks so much, but that's just my opinion.
T. Joseph O'Malley
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I think the average person with an average amount of memorization skills (whatever that means) would do well to start with Bound to Please.

As mentioned above it has a section on mnemonics to really get you going. You can also get the same approach with slightly different specifics from Greater Magic, if that doorstopping cynderblock of a book is in your library.

Vernon also explains a bit about mnemonics as applied to cards on volume 11 of Revelations and, hey, while we're at it, Harry Lorayne's memory courses deal with the memorization of cards, too.

Aronson doesn't make much reference to the actual mnemonic tools too often outside of that one chapter, I don't think. He just wants you to memorize the stack, any way possible, and is giving you a method.
tjo'
Daegs
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I know you asked about the Aronson stack, but I'd like to suggest Joyal's Six hour Memorized deck.

Personally I don't like mnemonics, and Joyal's system is a lot more logical and structured. So if you're that type of person, check it out.

It is not only very fast to learn (took me about 3 hours), but also stays in your memory a long time, because of the way that the "rules" are structured.
Steve Martin
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The goal with a stack is to learn it so well that you no longer need to rely on any rule or mnemonic - you just KNOW that a card represents a particular number, without any conscious thought. The rules or mnemonics are there to help you learn the stack in the first place. You have to pick the way that works best for you.

I have read a lot about stacks recently, and I conclude that I am not concerned with the method of learning one (in the end all stacks are the same from a memory point of view - I have developed my own method for memorising an order) so much as having the most useful stack.

So far as I know, out of the popular "standard stacks", Aronson's stack contains the most built-in features.

However, why not invent your own stack that includes built-in effects of your own?
Any man who reads too much and uses his own brain too little falls into lazy habits of thinking.
Albert Einstein
cpatchett
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Simon has a downloadable PDF at his Web site that talks about memorized decks and lists the stack. Use that with a flashcard program for your computer (or just make up your own flashcards from a deck of cards, write the stack position numbers on the back of each card with a Sharpie).

That will help you get it memorized (and will end up and get you to a point where it's truly usable faster than the mnemonics). You can then research the best books for effects using the stack (or any memorized deck).

Craig
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Close.Up.Dave
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http://www.stackview.com has a computer program that has a shuffle calculator on it and a quizor. I use the Tamariz stack and the program has helped me memorize it faster than I did the Aronson.
rtgreen
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Thanks, guys. These are great resources. I've tried to learn a memorized stack for quite some time, but have come to the conclusion I have very short term memory. Now, I, uh... (what was I talking about?)

Oh yea, thanks. Smile I think these will be a great help.
cpatchett
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Start with 10 cards, then once you get those down cold add 10 more. Keep going until you have the whole deck. Then once you have it make sure you keep reviewing as often as possible.

Craig
Magician: Someone willing to spend $15 to learn how to make $1 disappear.
magicmancas
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Stick with Bound to Please. Uou will be happy you did.
T. Joseph O'Malley
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My main reason for learning mnemonics is that someday I'd like to be able to simply memorize any deck of cards at any time, anywhere. Well, when it's convenient. I haven't had much time to work on this.

While I know the Aronson stack, I DON'T know it cold. A gentleman from the magic shop often quizzes me by calling out Six of Clubs! or Eight of Hearts! To be honest, I have a hard time naming the position on the spot (though I appreciate his efforts).

I *can* get the number most of the time, but it's not "instant" for me yet. According to one of Osterlind's manuscripts (yes, Osterlind), this is OK because I would truly look like I was trying to "see" the card in my mind - if I was using the stack for mentalism purposes - but I don't feel comfortable with it all yet.
tjo'
Midwestmagic
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I agree Bound to Please to start with then move on to Try the Imposable!
bdekolta
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Simon's book A Stack To Remember covers the mnemonics in some detail. I don't know if that book is still available or part of a compilation. Main thing is to keep practicing.
T. Joseph O'Malley
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That book you mention is now a part of "Bound to Please".
tjo'
Close.Up.Dave
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In order to memorize a deck and know it cold you should:

1) Shuffle a deck and keep reseting the deck back up into the stack. If you constantly set up the deck it helps remember it.

2) Practice tricks with it that require you to go throug the entire stack, not just tricks that you need to know cards and numbers. A trick like Four of a Kind by Juan Tamariz is perfect for this.

3) Practice the open index (jazzing) with a memorized deck. Go through the suits, estimate and reveal the spades in order. This helps you memorized how far down each card is in the deck.

4) Use it. Nothing helps you more than actually keeping a memorized deck in performance.
Brazilian
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Quote:
On 2004-07-15 20:07, bdekolta wrote:
Simon's book A Stack To Remember covers the mnemonics in some detail. I don't know if that book is still available or part of a compilation. Main thing is to keep practicing.

I saw the book "A Stack to remember" for $15,00.
Is more economical you buy "Bound to Please" for $28,00(with discount) (35,00 regular price)
T. Joseph O'Malley
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Bound to please has a LOT more stuff in it than a Stack to Remember (as well as including that booklet). You're absolutely right, it's a better deal to buy BTP.
tjo'
anthonyb
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In another thread on this subject someone suggested making flash cards--writing the relative number on the back of the cards. Great for testing yourself. I, too, am avoiding mnemonics and going straight in to learning a few cards at a time and it seems to be working.
Anthony Brahams
www.thecairnpress.com
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