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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The workers » » Paul Harris "Solid Deception" (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

jw_2101
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I have been working on this trick because I like the "gagish" ending, it suits me well. Smile However there is a (my opinion only) weak moment when the face up signed card does not rise to the top but only to the second position of the deck.... how does one"explain" or laugh away this failure to the audience....

Another question I have is when in a routine (am new at putting tricks in a routine) does one do a trick that clearly requires a deck switch?

Thanks,
jonathan
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Myrddin
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Hi Jonathan

Solid Deception is a fun trick I did many years.

Instead of replacing the face up double on the face up deck, I change the visible card on the deck to the signed card with a paint brush color change-like move. This gives the illusion that the card does come to the top after all.

Good luck
Peter
Gary
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I believe this effect has been reworked or at least further comments have been added in The Art of Astonishment Book 1.

Good timing and the right participant is important for this effect as the spectator can feel a bit foolish at the end.
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RandyWakeman
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I'll break the pack (ummh) and say that this is a flawed effect for more than one or two people. Theatrically, it destroys itself.
Paul
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I used to use this effect as a closer to a close up routine. I honestly don't recall the card coming to a position second from the top, perhaps I eliminated that. I did switch the deck in, starting the ambitious sequence with a straight deck, then switching the deck while getting a pen for the selection to be signed. I actually took the effect a stage further.

Danny Korem had a version with a clear block of plastic for a climax,(The Omni Deck) in his book, and marketed. Having tried it I prefered the solid deck.

It's a great trick, I am sure you can work around the "second from the top" bit with a little thought.

I am not sure where Randy is coming from when he says theatrically it destroys itself. I think this is one of Harris' best, a great climax to an ambitious card routine.

Paul.
RandyWakeman
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Quote:
I am not sure where Randy is coming from when he says theatrically it destroys itself. I think this is one of Harris' best, a great climax to an ambitious card routine.

Paul.


The "Omni Deck" was the Jerry Andrus idea.

The problem with performing "Solid Deception" for a large group is that while the individual that cuts the deck "gets it," nobody else does at that time. The climax is diluted, spread over time, and different audience members understand the effect at intervals.

That's what makes it theatrically incorrect, compared to the crisp (for ex.), surprise finish of "Triumph," or "Card To Wallet" where everyone "gets it," and at the same moment.
Raj
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Randy, that's entirely true.

In AoA, Harris makes some suggestions that if performing for a small crowd that you should make clear the difference of effect between an ambitious card effect and a solid deck effect. "That's all well and fine but can you do all that if the deck was glued together. Of course you can't, but if you could - it would look something like this" - or thereabouts.
Thoughtreader
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I used to do Solid Deception for a very long time. I started with Paul Harris' "Vanishing Deck" first, which of course resulted in the deck reappearing in the card case. I then went into the "ambitious card" routine with the SD deck. There was never a selection coming to the second position in my routine. Just the card coming to the top, and once to the bottom. Then when I asked the spectator to cut the deck, I stop them before they do and state that "it might be difficult if...." and then I stand the deck on it's side and kick it over, which as a visual was very powerful.
My only complaint was that after a number of performances, the glue stick starts to break away with chunks of cards breaking at various points, necessitating a new SD deck to be made.

PSIncerely Yours,
Paul Alberstat
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p.b.jones
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Hi,
Randy I agree with you about the impact on a larger group. I overcome it as follows first I bought one of the Andrus Omni decks then I sawed it in half across the short edges then drilled the edges and inserted two pins in the cut edge of one half and left two holes for the pins to fit into in the other cut edge. I then stuck matching half cards to the front and back of the gimmick. Now when you reach the climax, you say something like,
" Please put your card back in the centre of the deck yourself. infact i will cut it in half to make it easy for you" pull the deck into two halves one in each hand for applause as this climax can be seen and understood even to a large audience.
Phillip
Paul
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In the original book Harris did discuss how the patter/approach had to be varied for a larger group. As I said, I took it a fraction further anyway Smile

The idea of the plastic deck was Jerry Andrus' but Korem adapted it to the Harris routine.

Harris had one or two good "solid" ideas.

Paul.
RandyWakeman
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The Marlo idea of using a strung deck solves most of the problems.

That is one facet too often overlooked - - how do we make an item play for 150 people as well as for two? Go to any "close-up" convention . . . the conditions are rarely that.
Paul
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re;
"That is one facet too often overlooked - - how do we make an item play for 150 people as well as for two? Go to any "close-up" covention . . . the conditions are rarely that."

This is true.

I'd not come across the Marlo idea of using the strung deck. Interesting, but I somehow sense it is not as final or clean as a solid block, in fact the "effect" is quite different. It strikes me as a more interesting climax for magicians who are familiar with strung decks.

Paul.
RandyWakeman
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There's reason for that, Paul - - the routine is not in print yet.

It is interesting that most that have done this effect for a time have given the finish a little bit of help, one way or another.
CS Sheridan
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Paul, love the idea of switching to the gaff during an ambitious routine. I've had 'Solid' for some time but have only put it to use several times because (and probably from lack of thinking) I didn't have a way to make it part of a bigger routine. Thanks for the idea, glad some people never stop thinking!
Jones
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Interesting thread.

To me "solid deck" means "omni-deck," yet it would appear that I'm in the minority.
Why? What am I missing? Either the deck is discovered to have been glued together or the deck is discovered to be a solid block of perspex! As climaxes go, are these really in the same league?
Paul
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re;
"Either the deck is discovered to have been glued together or"

I don't think they think of the deck as being "glued together" as moments ago it has been shuffled, cards inserted etc. The "effect" is that it has suddenly and magically become one solid object. You refer to it as a glued together deck because YOU know that is exactly what it is.

Having used both, I prefer the deck to the plastic. What is more effective, a silver half dollar that changes into a copper coin, or a silver half dollar that changes into a gold half dollar, or maybe becomes bent? A silver to copper coin must be a clever switch. When the coin remains the same but its consistency changes there is more doubt, something HAPPENED to the coin, shades of alchemy etc.

I think it is the same with the deck. At least I would like to think so. Of course, knowing what spectators think is a hazardous business at the best of times, but we like to think we know what they think. Sometimes we're right, Smile sometimes we're wrong.
Smile

Paul.
Jones
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Fine answer Paul.

These are not two similar climaxes as I had thought. I now view them as seperate effects, each with its own character.

It seems that the performer is forever handicapped as regards the mind of a spectator. Even when we are deceived, our perception differs from laymen.
Fortunately, dealers are a great help in this regard as their marketed effects always carry extensive and accurate descriptions of the sort of reactions we can expect. Smile

Ian.
Paul
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re;
dealers are a great help in this regard as their marketed effects always carry extensive and accurate descriptions of the sort of reactions we can expect

lol.
I once had some intructions from Tannens where the last line was; "at this point you can expect your standing ovation!"

Paul.
Geoff Williams
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Quote:
On 2002-08-13 11:05, Paul wrote:
I once had some intructions from Tannens where the last line was; "at this point you can expect your standing ovation!"


I assume the next-to-the-last line was "Offer to pay handsomely anyone who would stand and applaud."

HA!
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Paul
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Ahhh, so that's the line that should have been in that gap! Thanks Geoff.

For magicians, when Bob Read stacks ice cubes he explains he only learned it because his badly printed instructions missed the "d" from "dice stacking".Smile
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