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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The October 2004 entrée: David Parr » » Best way to grow into a professional magician » » TOPIC IS LOCKED (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

dominik
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Hi David.

Let me tell you a little story.

Once upon a time.... there was a little boy who dreamed of becoming a magician. He had a book about general magic, and a book on self-working card magic. But he didn't know where to obtain the paraphernalia required or where to find a book on what he considered "real" (professional caliber) card magic.

Many years went by as he did other things due to the lack of material and support by his parents.
But he never gave up his dream...

So here I am, palming coins with both hands, pinky counting, side stealing peeked selections, practicing perfect tabled Faros.
(No, I don't do the moves all at the same time ;-)
And I wonder if I can speed up my development as a magician. My day job consumes 40 hours a week, so my practice schedule is by necessity restricted to about 20-35 hours a week, and I am seeking to get the most out of it.

David, could you give any suggestions on how to grow as a magician more quickly?
Review King
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Interesting story. Did this person grow up and turn out to be Charles Manson?
:rotf:
"Of all words of tongue and pen,
the saddest are, "It might have been"

..........John Greenleaf Whittier
dominik
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No. Neither one nor the other.
Review King
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Why blame your folks for lack of support? If they fed and clothed you and didn't beat or abuse you, they did their job. If you're pinky counting, side stealing peeked selections and practicing perfect tabled Faros, you seem to be have learned quite a bit. Do you have a show you perform? You're a professional if you are getting paid. Go get some shows and you'll have arrived.
"Of all words of tongue and pen,
the saddest are, "It might have been"

..........John Greenleaf Whittier
dominik
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Your are right, Chris. I'll stop complaining immediately. I am currently practicing for my first show. It will take 20 to 30 minutes and some of the tricks require me to sit down at a table. I am currently working on the missing 50% of the whole show.
David Parr
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Magic is a performing art, and experience is the great teacher. The surest way to learn and grow is to perform magic as much as possible. As I mentioned in an earlier post, working a regular restaurant gig in my twenties helped my skill set and my material evolve rather quickly.

You might also seek a group of like-minded individuals in your city, get together regularly and help one another work on magic. If such a group does not exist in your area, you might try creating one.

If by "professional" you mean "a person whose sole source of income is magic," I'd advise controlling the impulse to rush ahead. Enjoy your semi-pro status. As I wrote in an earlier post, money is sometimes an obstacle to artisic growth. It is difficult enough to master a creative art, without bringing the sordid realities of commerce into the mix.
Review King
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Dominik, great question because it sparked an answer from David that will help us all. Thanks!!!

Chris
"Of all words of tongue and pen,
the saddest are, "It might have been"

..........John Greenleaf Whittier
dominik
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That was the sole purpose of my post, Chris.
To clarify what I mean by "professional": A professional is someone who makes a living by doing magic. By this definition, "professional" is not the same as "good". But if you have to perform a lot to make a living, any professional magician will eventually turn into a good one.
Roslyn
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But surely ownly a good magician will become a pro?

Roslyn
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dominik
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I hope so.
Michael_MacDonald
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Sadly enough, there are lots of "pro" magi out there that are less then good....

for example, I was at a festival where I was paid to perform, there was also a corporate sponserd magician on just befor me, he was hired by one of the companies with booth space.

his show consisted on degrading one child after another on stage, one of the children actually ran off stage crying.

when I talked to the man after he said he was working for this company for the last 3 years.

in my view he is pro, but also in my view he is a sad excuse and lends a bad name to all others in our field.
dominik
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That's very sad.

That man is a pro by my preceding definition. Unfortunately, like in any profession, while some professionals convey a positive image of our profession to the public, others ruin its reputation. I wonder why he still gets hired.
Some magicians don't seem to care. Obviously, some companies don't either.

It seems that becoming a really good magician is not just about practice and experience, but also about thought and attitude.
Mark Martinez
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Intresting, do you think that the company really doesn't care or more likely they don't know any better???

There are lot of shows were the clients tell me, "Your the only magician that I have ever seen. I can't wait to see the show."

How would they know if a magician is good or not? They will know if they have a good time, but that's all they have to judge a magician by. How would they know that that some other magician would make them have an even better time and have more fun?

Thoughts?
Magically,
Mark

Success comes before work only in the dictionary. - Anonymous
dominik
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That's right, many people have never seen a magician. The first one they see automatically becomes the best magician they have ever seen.
Some people always go to the same baker or hairdresser, and never try a different one unless they are really dissatisfied. But why is that?
How can they expect to get quality when they do not compare?
But knowing what we know, how can we
1) change it, or
2) use it to our advantage?
If all clients act in this way, then to be the "best" magician means to be the first magician a potential client comes in contact with.
I don't like this conclusion, but I think it's true.
David Parr
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Hi Mark. Good to see you here!

You make a good point. Because of inexperience, most people's expectations for magic are really very low. In many cases, they are content simply to be distracted for a half hour from the daily concerns of work and home. The performer does not have to work very hard, or be very competent, to fulfill such meager expectations. Part of my task as a magician is to educate people as to what magic can be when it is performed with respect for both the art and the audience.
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The October 2004 entrée: David Parr » » Best way to grow into a professional magician » » TOPIC IS LOCKED (0 Likes)
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